Thursday, May 12, 2005

Hard on Tards

There have been a lot of strong comments under the post "Concrete Ideas." Togetherness says a lot about a service. Can we all try to pull together and try to establish that once more? No, 80% of our calls don't sound particularly interesting or fun (thousand year-old female c/o weakness). But trying to help each other out by jumping calls if you're closer or if you know a a crew is trying to get a 40, or voluntarily going to a scene where crews sound like they need help would build up our cohesiveness and make HD an even better place to work.
Think there are a lot of "tards" here? How about instead of whining about it, we use that energy to try and make them better EMT's. If you think someone can't hang, might it be because no one properly showed them?
To all the old people out there, remember when you were first here? What made you a better medic when you were green? Wasn't it the experienced people with a combination of accurate instruction as well as giving you a hard time for being the FNG? When was the last time we explained to a new person why we do something? Or show a "tard" how to write a report or start an IV or talk to med control? I know I learned most of my skills by doing it with good partners, not from P-class. Because of this, I knew ACLS algorithms, how to mix drips, draw up drugs, get non-emergents and decompress chests long before I ever went to paramedic class. Why? Because my partners showed a little initiative and caring about their work to help me out as a green FNG.
If we care so much about our reputation and the quality of medics at HD, doesn't it devolve upon us to take it upon ourselves to improve it? When we were new, the old-timers then made HD a great service. Now that many of us are the old timers, we must uphold the "tradition." If you want to "weed out the tards," YOU should take it upon yourself to make them better EMT's. After all, it'll be their job when we're gone. It's up to us to show them how.

22 comments:

Melinda said...

That's what I love about you Fitz.... you have a positive and motivational attitude. Always trying to make good of a "bad" situation (if you want to call it that).

Capt.SaveAHoe said...

I agree with you FITZ . However, the "TARDS" that I've spoke of in the past were people that are UNSAVEABLE and thats alot coming from "CAPT SAVE A HO". And For some reason I've gotten the people that suck. And have ran away my fair share of "TARDS" Yep I was new and to be truthful still consider myself new because everyday I still learn things. God can save the queen . But this Capt. cant save every HO-TARD.

Nick said...

Sean...although I agree with you and I too believe that this is the way that it is supposed to be...I must disagree with you a little. I have tried to teach some of the tards and without a doubt several of them think that they know everything there is to know about this profession. By the time they realize that they do not....it is usually too late. I have heard numerous FNG's say that they should be respected because they work here and you and I both know that is JUST NOT TRUE! Here you not only get the respect that you deserve, but you get the respect you EARN! We were taught that by some of the people you and Capt. Save-A-Ho mentioned and I credit THEM with teaching me to be a Paramedic...not to just do a job. I know that I am not the best; i know I am not the worst. I know the reputation I have, but in all honesty...I am the way I am because of the people who taught me. And if that makes it easier for me to pick out the tards...then so be it...I will try to teach, I will try to be patient(contrary to popular belief) but I have no patience for the attitudes that we have seen in the past few years. They need to understand that they could learn a lot if they just shut up and listen. This type of medicine is not always going to be as black and white as you see it in a book. It is alright to just settle for being a protocol Paramedic...by that I mean...you can just treat a patient based upon whatever protocol they fit under. There is nothing wrong with that...but it takes a lot of personal dedication to actually keep the books opened, read them and study drugs and new treatments for the emergent patient. In my humble opinion...that is what makes you a good Paramedic.

Sean said...

Yes, Nick, it is a two way street. Respect has to be earned. It is not a part of our uniform. And knowledge cannot simply be dispensed by experienced people; in order for knowledge to be useful, it takes an active effort on the part of the learner.
This gives me the occasion to write an afterword on my post: If you're new at HD, when was the last time you asked a question and tried to get an answer? Even on a subject you think you already know? And if the first person didn't give you a good answer, did you ask another? Further, do you put that knowledge to use; change your way of doing things?
Working for HD WILL NOT get you respected, but being a good EMT always will, no matter where you work.

Chad said...

I have experienced a good deal of this in the Army so far. We train them fairly efficiently through intense physical activity. You do something stupid, I teach you the correct way to do it and make you carry a 50 pound sandbag every where you go for the rest of the day, and you remember next time.

Anonymous said...

Although I have a long way to go, I must say that I have learned a lot fom those paramedcs who took the time to help me out and answer my many questions. I wanna give a big thanks to Sean and Nick and i'm sorry to say that I think Nick and I are getting split up..that sucks. -Susan

Anonymous said...

I get the feeling that all the stupid people you are referring to are basics. I agree that I learned a copious amount from my Paramedic partners, but that includes what to do and what NOT to do. How about the paramedic that didn't intubate an agonal patient. They felt a NRB would suffice. Or what about the paramedic that wanted to give Lasix to a patient who had junky breath sounds. Might tachycardia and a fever indicate something else (i.e. pneumonia)? It's all well and good to want to show someone the right way, but when you have arrogant paramedics who refuse to admit that they were wrong or refuse to listen to their partner whether they be a basic or another paramedic, then they will continue to improperly treat patients. They will also continue to teach the "FNG's" they wrong way. I think the people with the years on the job need to step back and make sure that the skills AND the attitude they pass on are not only correct but responsible. Taking Michael Paxton off of Canal street into the projects isn't teaching that "FNG" to be a compassionate or wise medic. What legacy do you want to leave behind?

T-MAN said...

Don't take this as an attack on basics, hell half the I and P's would n't make the shift withouy there basics. TRhis is inreffence to all persons who work here and are whether new level or new hire.So don't play this as a level thing.

T-MAN said...

Where's spell check when you need it.LOL

Sean said...

No kidding T-man! I am a firm believer in "Paramedics save lives; Basics save paramedics"!
Just because someone is a Paramedic, or B or I, or for that matter, an RN or MD doesn't mean they're not a tard.

Nick said...

Anonymus,

I think that your assessment of the situation is somewhat correct, but neither I nor Sean are making this out to be about what level you are. I have worked with several Basics that I would let work on me...not to mention my family. I am not sure what level you are....my guess is that you are a Basic...but I think that if you would research what you are talking about you may understand a little better about the signs and symptoms and treatment modality behind a lot of the things that we all see out there. I have seen things that I do not agree with, and have made mistakes too, but again...I refer to my previous statements. Constant research of drugs, new and innovative emergency treatments, and actually treating your patient not your equipment...is how you stay on top of the game and become a good medic. Basics can do this too, and it sounds like you might do this, if so I commend you. But let's not play the "I'm the Paramedic...you're the Basic" game.

Anonymous said...

Guess what ya'll....A TARD IS A TARD AND A TARD WILL ALWAYS BE A TARD!!!!!!!!!!!!

Capt.SaveAHoe said...

Hell I talk to other people from other areas of the country. And there like "Yea our basic's just drive" I'd have a sz. if that was the case here. As a matter of fact I neva even think about someone being a basic when I'm on a real call . I'm more like "SWEET we got a IV" then afterwords we go eat some TOT's

Anonymous said...

okay folks, about my tard comment....i wasn't referring to basics, i was talking about paramedics, if you believe you're not a tard then don't be insulted. first of all i am a paramedic, i've worked with quite a few paramedics who i've seen do some pretty wrong things and have tried to address said things only to be told that i'm a new medic and don't know enough. regardless of how long you've been a medic if you have a knowledge base and know how to take care of people how long you've been at hd doesn't really matter. they have preceptors there that really don't belong precepting anybody. my point is this, how do you explain something to someone who thinks they know everything. as far as sean and nick you don't fall into the catergory, there's a few more as well, but i shouldn't have to list names, after all we don't choose this profession for the recognition, do we?

grrlmedic said...

how come ya gotta be anonymous?If you're confident enough with what you say then sign your name to it!And if anybody gives ya sh*t tell me....i'll write it and sign my name...as long as i agree with whats being said!! :) How come i've just found out bout this page??? Dont dis the dyke ya'll!! ;)

Sean said...

I've seen some fucked up paramedics too. The problem with a bad paramedic is they were never a good basic. Someone may "grow into" an adequate EMT, but if you're not a good basic, you'll never be a good paramedic.

Nick said...

Anonymous,
Thanks for the vote of confidence. I wish you would let us know who you are so I can thank you in person. But anyway, I am not sure who you have worked with in the past...all I can tell you is that the approach to telling someone that they did something wrong is a hard thing to do. The best way to handle it as far as I am concerned is to talk to the person face to face and see if there can be a resolution there...if not then you need to take it to the next level. We do have a chain of command and some of us need to remember that. Supervisors may not always be right, but they have a job to do just like us...if that does not work...follow the chain higher and higher until the appropriate actions are taken. You may get some dirty looks (trust me I have gotten them and they do not feel very good at all)but as long as you are right... my motto is fuck them! Remember, it is not about making friends; it's all about the patient and making sure that you get them to the hospital with appropriate interventions taken. I too agree that there are preceptors here that have NO business teaching/precepting anyone. This is something that we cannot control until they fuck up. Don't worry about it...I try to remember the saying that if you give them enough rope they will eventually hang themselves! Your comments?

Anonymous said...

nick,nick,nick...as you know, because you've now experienced the new administration, the chain of command didn't work, perhaps maybe with juliette and mark things will be different.
i tried the chain of command thing it didn't work and i agree with seans point about being a good basic first, but you also have to have compassion for every patient you deal with whether it be our friend michael paxton or a weakness call that comes in every other day, people who are not compliant with their meds and so on, instead of bithcing about the calls or the fact the pt chose to buy beer instead of high blood pressure meds, you should spend time trying to educate the pt as to why its so important to take the meds and not the beer! yes its frustrating and repetitive but just take a look at the first chapter in the medic text, the roles of the medic, how about pt education and advocacy, doesn't say anything in there about putting on your go-go gadget belt and bragging about all the gsws you've had....again i'm not talking about you!

resQscooter said...

FRANKSANDBEANS!!!!! but seriously, I tried to make this point a few weeks ago. It is extremely important for the "more seasoned" medics to step up to the plate and pass on the knowledge we have. Also, a good work ethic is entirely essential. I was exposed to some very good preceptors and partners in my career and have done my best to show respect to them, the patients, and my students by trying to give them the best that I can. OK, this is sounding like a silly commercial so I'll shut up now. Oh, one more thing... T-Man obviously needs a spelling preceptor; any takers?

i'msofain said...

Scott, i used to tutor international ESL students in college...i was a professional copyeditor after that...and even I don't know what to make of the grammatical acrobatics T-Man does with the written English language!!!

T-MAN said...

Alright now I'll sit down and lean a new word each day from the dictionary..... Back to the subject. We all seem to have the same ideals on how to or what needs to be done to help all those who may have difficulty in the field at times. But as it has been said before untill you decide that maybe what I do or what feel is right, may not be and accept advise critisism from your fellow employees nothing will ever change. Savahoe also said it correctly, some may just be lost causes no matter what. And hell yes some of us may have just been doing this to damn long and are stuck in the old way ruts which may be a problem it self. That's why I enjoy doing this, the chance to see or learn something diffent each day helps keep up the excitement for the job. I'll be the first to say by far I'm middle of the pack if not lower half in the realms of hd paramedics. Doesn't stop me from tring or listening to someone who may know more or updated ways so I can improve myself. That brings me to what Keelie said, Anonymous good stong points and opions you have so why hide, stand tall when your right.

Code-2 said...

Y'all all have a lot af good pionts in reguards to TARDS. My humble opinion on TARDS really does not matter mutch to most any way.But I'll let y'all know it any how. In my view, those who I consider tards will always be tards to me , unless they can grow as medics and people. Some allready have, most have not.So to those who are no longer tards in my veiw, good going. Those who have not changed in my eyes, well they just havent had the right size boot put in thier ass yet. So as not to end my rambling on a negetive note I'm going to pass on a few pearls of widom some of my former partners and preceptors passed on to me. Hopefully a tard will read this and become a better medic and person, and no longer shall he/she be held in my opinion as a tard.
Always consider the worst case scinario and what to do about it. ... Nick Cullota.
Never take anything for granted....Indigestion might not be indigestion no matter how shure you are....Brenda Carter.
Just Because you haven't seen it does not mean it can't happen to you on your call,(i.e. rebound hypoglycemia after of a pt s/p D50 and an A.M.A.)....Cesar Corzantes.
Thats all for now. If they make sense to you, good. If not, then you might be a TARD.
Oh hear's one that I forgot and its a personal fave...
If you have nothing good to say, then shut the f**k up....I can't remember where I heard that one.